Podcasts

It’s not that simple

It’s not that simple

It’s not that simple is a podcast by Fundação Francisco Manuel dos Santos dedicated to major interviews with international personalities linked to politics, economy and society. Conducted by renowned journalist Pedro Mendonça Pinto, the conversations with our special guests aim to demystify and simplify some of the most fascinating and relevant topics of our time. They will be objective, frontal, informal and informed dialogues to clarify why some issues «are not that simple».
8 EPISÓDIOS

Ep. 8 - EP 8 | GLOBAL ECONOMY with Michael Spence

21 jul 2022
How much impact did the Covid-19 pandemic and the Russian invasion of Ukraine have on the global economy? How will technology change sectors like health or education? What is causing the slowdown in economic growth around the world? How worried should we be about inflation? To answer these questions, Pedro Pinto interviews Michael Spence in this episode of “It’s Not That Simple”, a podcast by the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation. A Nobel Laureate in Economic Sciences, Michael Spence is the Philip H. Knight Professor Emeritus of Management in the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, and a Distinguished Visiting Fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is an Adjunct Professor at Bocconi University in Milan, and an Honorary Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford University. Spence is a Senior Advisor to Jasper Ridge Partners and a Senior Advisor to General Atlantic Partners. He co-chairs (with Dr. Victor Fung) the Advisory Council of the Asia Global Institute and was the Chairman of The Independent Commission on Growth and Development (2006-2010). In this episode, Spence discusses how congestion in global supply chains contributed to rising inflation, and what central banks can do to try to keep it under control. He also examines the role of the United States and China in the global economy, and how they can increase productivity growth. Spence also addresses how the labour market has changed and will continue to change because of the Covid-19 pandemic and technology. Finally, Spence considers the impact “digital nomads” coming to live in Portugal while working remotely have on the local housing market, and how the country can balance the benefits of attracting dynamic foreign entrepreneurs with the ability to ensure that the local population isn’t “priced out” of its own cities.

Episódios disponíveis

EP 8 | GLOBAL ECONOMY with Michael Spence

Ep. 8 - EP 8 | GLOBAL ECONOMY with Michael Spence

How much impact did the Covid-19 pandemic and the Russian invasion of Ukraine have on the global economy? How will technology change sectors like health or education? What is causing the slowdown in economic growth around the world? How worried should we be about inflation? To answer these questions, Pedro Pinto interviews Michael Spence in this episode of “It’s Not That Simple”, a podcast by the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation. A Nobel Laureate in Economic Sciences, Michael Spence is the Philip H. Knight Professor Emeritus of Management in the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, and a Distinguished Visiting Fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is an Adjunct Professor at Bocconi University in Milan, and an Honorary Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford University. Spence is a Senior Advisor to Jasper Ridge Partners and a Senior Advisor to General Atlantic Partners. He co-chairs (with Dr. Victor Fung) the Advisory Council of the Asia Global Institute and was the Chairman of The Independent Commission on Growth and Development (2006-2010). In this episode, Spence discusses how congestion in global supply chains contributed to rising inflation, and what central banks can do to try to keep it under control. He also examines the role of the United States and China in the global economy, and how they can increase productivity growth. Spence also addresses how the labour market has changed and will continue to change because of the Covid-19 pandemic and technology. Finally, Spence considers the impact “digital nomads” coming to live in Portugal while working remotely have on the local housing market, and how the country can balance the benefits of attracting dynamic foreign entrepreneurs with the ability to ensure that the local population isn’t “priced out” of its own cities.
21 jul 2022 31m
EP 7 | FROM RAGS TO RICHES with John Friedman

Ep. 7 - EP 7 | FROM RAGS TO RICHES with John Friedman

What is social mobility? How can we measure it? How can we promote it? Is the “American Dream” still alive? How did the Covid-19 pandemic impact social mobility around the world? To answer these questions, Pedro Pinto interviews John Friedman in this episode of “It’s Not That Simple”, a podcast by the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation. An expert on social mobility, John Friedman is a Professor of Economics at Brown University, as well as a founding co-Director of Opportunity Insights. He studies the causes and consequences of inequality for kids, as well as policies to improve opportunity for children from disadvantaged backgrounds. His work has appeared in top academic journals as well as in major media outlets, has been cited by President Obama in his 2012 State of the Union Address, and has shaped policies at the federal, state, and local level. Most recently, John and his colleagues at Opportunity Insights have published the Economic Tracker, providing the most granular and real-time look at how COVID-19 is affecting the economy in cities and states across America. He worked as Special Assistant to the President for Economic Policy at the National Economic Council in the White House. He is also a Research Associate at NBER and a Co-Editor of American Economic Review. In this episode, Friedman discusses the importance of a person’s childhood and young adulthood in shaping their adult life and how high a step in the social ladder they will be able to reach, as well as how much education – and high-quality teachers – matter to a person’s social mobility. Friedman also addresses how society limits people’s opportunities depending on the circumstances into which they were born, and how women still face more obstacles to their social mobility than men. Finally, Friedman looks at the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and the Russian invasion of Ukraine on social mobility in different parts of the world, in a conversation well worth listening to.
21 jul 2022 29m
EP 6 | BREXIT with R. Daniel Kelemen

Ep. 6 - EP 6 | BREXIT with R. Daniel Kelemen

How disastrous was “Brexit”? How much did it affect the United Kingdom’s economy and its living standards? How has it changed the political relationship between the UK and the European Union? Could it ever be reversed? To answer these questions, Pedro Pinto interviews R. Daniel Kelemen in this episode of “It’s Not That Simple”, a podcast by the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation. An expert on European Affairs, Kelemen is a Professor of Political Science and Law at Rutgers University, where he is the Chair of the Department of Political Science. Prior to Rutgers, Kelemen was Fellow in Politics at the Lincoln College, University of Oxford. He has been a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, visiting fellow in the Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA) at Princeton University, and a Fulbright Fellow at the Centre for European Policy Studies in Brussels. Kelemen is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and he is a frequent commentator on EU affairs in US and international media. In this episode, Kelemen discusses how the pandemic and the war in Ukraine have masked the negative impact of “Brexit”, the future of the relationship between the UK and Europe, and the role of the British government led by Boris Johnson. Kelemen also addresses the way in which the public’s attitude towards politics increasingly resembles a fan’s attitude towards the football team they root for, and the process of democratic backsliding and increasing authoritarianism in some European Union countries. Finally, Kelemen looks at the 2022 French presidential elections, at how Russia's invasion of Ukraine will unite Europe, and at Putin's efforts to divide it, in a conversation well worth listening to.
21 jul 2022 25m
EP 5 | WOMEN’S RIGHTS with Leymah Gbowee

Ep. 5 - EP 5 | WOMEN’S RIGHTS with Leymah Gbowee

What is it like growing up in a country in civil war? What remains to be achieved in the struggle for women's rights? Will it be possible to heal the wounds opened by the wars of the present and the past? Is it possible to reach peace when the scars of war are still visible? To answer these questions, Pedro Pinto interviews Leymah Roberta Gbowee in this episode of “It’s Not That Simple”, a podcast by the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation. A Nobel Peace Prize laureate in 2011, Gbowee is a Liberian Peace Activist, Trained Social Worker and Women’s Rights Advocate. She is the Founder and current President of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa (GPFA). She also currently serves as the Executive Director of the Women, Peace and Security Program at Columbia University’s Earth Institute in New York, USA. She is the Co-Founder and former Executive Director of the Women Peace and Security Network Africa (WIPSEN-A) and a Founding Member and former Liberia Coordinator of Women in Peacebuilding Network (WIPNET). In this episode, Gbowee discusses her experience growing up in civil war-torn Liberia, her time in a refugee camp in Ghana, and how he set up small donut and braid businesses to be able to get food and money. Gbowee also addresses the work she does with victims of war and for peace, the biggest obstacles to peace today and what needs to be done to overcome them. Finally, Gbowee also looks at the progresses made in the struggle for women's rights, and the obstacles women still face today in cultures that do not recognize their worth.
21 jul 2022 31m
EP 4 | ECONOMY & COVID-19 with Adam Tooze

Ep. 4 - EP 4 | ECONOMY & COVID-19 with Adam Tooze

Has the Covid-19 pandemic changed the world's balance of economic power? How important were political leaders in responding to the crisis born out of the pandemic? Has the latter led to a proliferation of propaganda and disinformation? How serious is the threat of Covid-19 when compared to other problems facing humanity, such as global warming or other public health crises? To answer these questions, Pedro Pinto interviews Adam Tooze in this episode of “It’s Not That Simple”, a podcast by the Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation. A renowned historian, commentator and author, Adam Tooze is a Professor at Columbia University in New York, where he is Director of the European Institute. In the past, he has taught at Cambridge and Yale Universities, as well as at the United States Military Academy at West Point. Tooze teaches and researches widely in the fields of twentieth century and contemporary history with a special focus on the history of economics and a range of themes in political, intellectual, and military history, across a canvas stretching from Europe to the Atlantic. His books have won awards in several countries, and his articles have been published in newspapers or magazines such as the Financial Times, New York Times, The Guardian, Sunday Telegraph, Observer, Prospect Magazine, Times Literary Supplement, London Review of Books, Wall Street Journal, New York Review of Books, Die Zeit or Spiegel. In this episode, Tooze discusses the initial reaction of financial markets to the Covid-19 pandemic, the way in which the three major poles of the world economy (United States, the European Union and China) suffered an “extraordinary shock” with the pandemic, and how structural factors and luck were the decisive elements in each society’s response to the crisis. Tooze also addresses the challenge of global warming, the role that countries such as China, Brazil, India, or Indonesia may play in responding to this challenge, and what kind of measures will have to be adopted for this response to be successful. Finally, Tooze also looks at issues such as the Russian invasion of Ukraine (and the West’s and China’s responses), or how citizens and governments regard statistics, facts, and truth.
21 jul 2022 38m